Monday, May 7, 2012

Baltimore Sun – Sloane Brown: Pictures: What's in Store in Westminster


Pictures: What's in Store in Westminster – Off Track Art


Perhaps it's something in the air. But Westminster seems to be a center of creative expression.

Whether it's something created by a local artist or artisan or a home accent carefully chosen by a local business owner, you're sure to find something here that can bring a little self-expression to your home. -- Sloane Brown

[…]

What's in Store: Off Track Art
(Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun / April 26, 2012 )
Two businesses share this artistic space. Walk in the door and on the left, you'll enter Off Track Art, an artists cooperative which currently shows the work of 10 local artists.

On the right is Carousel Stained Glass, with work mostly by owner Roger Lewis, who also teaches locally and shows the work of his students.

From Off Track Art: a 20-inch-x-22-inch mixed media collage displayed in a 6-panel window, titled “Egg Visions” ($250) by Bob Waddell; a 32-inch-30-inch “Reclining Nude” laminated plywood sculpture by Linda Van Hart; and an 18-inch-x-12-inch red and black patchwork small laundry basket ($150) by nationally acclaimed basket maker Joyce Schaum.

Off Track Art and Carousel Stained Glass are at 11 Liberty St., Westminster.





 Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/
Kevin Dayhoff Art: http://www.kevindayhoff.com/ (http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/http://www.kevindayhoffart.com/ New Bedford Herald: http://kbetrue.livejournal.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/kevindayhoff
Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/ “Each one should use whatever gift he has received to serve others, faithfully administering God’s grace in its various forms.” 1 Peter 4:10

“Off Track Art” is an artists’ co-op and gallery located in the historic Liberty Building at 11 Liberty Street – next to the railroad tracks, off of the Sentinel parking lot at the corner of West Main St and MD 27-Liberty St - in historic downtown Westminster, Carroll County Maryland. 

Open: Wed-Fri. Noon to 6 PM , Sat. 10 AM - 5 PM. http://offtrackart.blogspot.com/ 
 For news and information on Off Track Art previous to December 15, 2011, you can go to http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/search/label/Art%20Off%20Track%20Art

Generations have been touched by Frock's 4-H and church leadership

Generations have been touched by Frock's 4-H and church leadership


Eagle Archive: Generations have been touched by Frock's 4-H and church leadership http://www.baltimoresun.com/explore/carroll/news/community/ph-ce-eagle-archive-0506-20120502,0,7820360.story



Fourteen years ago — on April 12, 1998 — the Baltimore Sun carried an article about my neighbor and good friend, Kathryn Myers Frock, in which it was noted:

"The Westminster woman, who is believed to be the longest-serving 4-H volunteer in the country, was surprised recently to be honored for 58 years of volunteer service.

"Fifty-eight years? thought Frock. Why 58?

"'Maybe they don't think I'm going to be here for 60 years,' she said with a smile."

Well, Frock made it to 60 years. As a matter of fact, make that 74 years that she was a 4-H leader and volunteer fair judge.

That said, with Frock, it was not as much about the quantity of years, but the quality.


Related and Updated for Kathryn Frock:

+++++++++++++++


Thursday, April 26, 2012





+++++++++++++++++

Westminster Eagle - Katie V. Jones: Kathryn Frock touts merits of 4-H life

Fair 'queen' touts merits of 4-H life 07/26/06 By Katie V. Jones

http://news.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?show=localnews&pnpID=978&NewsID=735396&CategoryID=17320&on=1



When Kathryn Frock joined 4-H in 1934, there were girl 4-H clubs and boy 4-H clubs. If you lived on a farm and worked with animals, however, you were allowed to belong to a "co-ed club."

In those days the fair was held in Taneytown, before moving to its current location behind the Agricultural Center in Westminster.

To build the buildings at the new site, the 4-H clubs raised money through various methods such as making moccasins and selling household "guidebooks."

At 89, Frock has more than 60 years of memories of being in 4-H, first as a member, then as a leader and currently as a judge… http://kevindayhoff.blogspot.com/2006/08/westminster-eagle-katie-v-jones-kathryn.html

+++++++++++++

Accolades mark a life of volunteering Westminster woman lauded for 4-H service April 12, 1998 By Sheridan Lyons

Accolades mark a life of volunteering Westminster woman lauded for 4-H service



The Westminster woman who is believed to be the longest-serving 4-H volunteer in the country was surprised recently to be honored for 58 years of volunteer service.

Fifty-eight years? thought Kathryn Frock. Why 58?

"Maybe they don't think I'm going to be here for 60 years," she said with a smile last week.

If there were a grandmaster of homemaking, Frock, 80, would qualify: Her skills range from the "seven-day pickles" she puts up to the carefully centered daisy buttons on a dress she made in 1936 that swept 4-H Club local, state and national needlework honors.



[…]

"This woman is phenomenal," said Bob Shirley, Carroll County's recently retired extension agent for 4-H. "The amount of volunteer work she's still doing and the number of organizations she's giving support to. And she still is a very strong, active leader," he said.


4H, 4H Carroll Co 4H FFA Fair, Ag Carroll Co MD Ag Center, Dayhoff Media Explore Carroll, People Frock Kathryn, People Obituaries, People Tributes

 Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/
Kevin Dayhoff Art: http://www.kevindayhoff.com/ (http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/http://www.kevindayhoffart.com/ New Bedford Herald: http://kbetrue.livejournal.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/kevindayhoff
Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/ “Each one should use whatever gift he has received to serve others, faithfully administering God’s grace in its various forms.” 1 Peter 4:10

Thursday, May 3, 2012

“Child of the Universe,” the latest exhibition by Phil Grout opens Friday at Off Track Art in Westminster

“Child of the Universe,” the latest exhibition by Phil Grout opens Friday at Off Track Art in Westminster


Award-winning Carroll County photojournalist, fine art photographer, and author, Phil Grout, will appear for the opening of his latest exhibition Friday, May 4, 2012, at Off Track Art in Westminster.

His latest exhibit, titled “Child of the Universe,” is a collection of 40 black and white images that come to life from Grout’s 45 years of documenting life in Americas, Africa, Asia and India.

Grout is no stranger to Off Track Art, where he exhibited extensively from January through June in 2011.

Previously Grout had a critically acclaimed retrospective show at Birdie’s Cafe, 233 E. Main St., Westminster, MD ran in November and December 2010. That show, “44/40,” spanned over four decades of Grout’s work, from Vietnam to Africa, Plains Georgia, to Carroll County; and included almost 70 pieces of work.

“I’ve never done a show like this,” said Grout in an interview last Wednesday. “This show focuses upon our humanity and what binds us together… It’s 40 4-by-6 inch framed black and white images of people and runs the gamut of emotions,” explained Grout.

For example, in “Afua's Hands,” Grout reminisces “Her name was Afua Nyame. At 83 she was the oldest cocoa farmer in the village of Odaho, Ghana, West Africa. In Harvest of Hope, a book by Grout for SERRV International, he wrote, “Hope carves trails in an old woman's hands then plows furrows up her arms, and all trails lead back home where food is never scarce and the medicine is always half full.”

In another photograph, “Giving Thanks,” Grout shares that it “is a portrait I made in 1971 of John and Irene Wolf saying grace in their humble Taneytown home. John was a huckster who hauled livestock to the Woodsboro auction for over 50 years. He would return many times with box lots of 19th century tools.

“Over the years he built an extensive collection of Americana and hand-wrought farm implements and tools. The Wolfs helped shine the light on my path which lead me round the world in search of the threads which bind us together as human beings.”

Since 1966 that path has lead Grout and his work throughout North, South and Central America, Asia and Africa gathering images for newspapers, magazines, wire services, and book publishers.

According to his website, philgrout.com, and a series of e-mail interviews, Grout said he “started to learn his craft as a photographer in 1966 working as a photojournalist for the U.S. Navy covering naval operations in Vietnam.

“But I quickly learned it wasn’t the images of war I was hunting, but more the face of humanity as I roamed the back alleys of Saigon; Hong Kong; Sasebo, Japan and Olongopo, Philippines.”

With pictures and words Grout, “became a gatherer of the threads which bind us together as human beings.”

After the war, Grout “came home and settled in rural Maryland with his wife, Mary Lou, and worked for nearly 10 years as a photographer, reporter, and editor for the Hanover Evening Sun in Westminster.”

Since moving to Carroll County, Grout has authored three critically acclaimed photo essay books. His work has been awarded by the Associated Press as well as various arts organizations. It has also been featured in art galleries throughout the United States.”

According to Grout, “I fell in love with this land and its people who worked the land in my new rural home. That love pulled me away to Plains, Georgia in the late 70’s to complete my first book as I lived in an abandoned sharecropper’s home near President Jimmy Carter’s farm, and learned first hand the rigors of working the land and documenting the “tillers of the soil.”

His first venture into the book world won him national critical acclaim, including recognition from Publisher’s Weekly which called A Spell in Plains “a triumph.”

In the 1980’s Grout took his camera throughout the developing world in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and India documenting the work of various relief organizations. 

A second book of photography, “Seeds of Hope,” “grew from the splinters left in the wake of a hurricane which cut a path through Nicaragua in 1988,” recalled Grout.

Grout then went on to live in Ghana, West Africa in 2002, with an extended family of cocoa farmers to create his latest book, “Harvest of Hope,” a portrait of those who toil to bring us chocolate.

Grout, who is also an avid gardener, is constantly pushing the artistic envelope in search of new and innovative ways to tell a story, over the past four decades he has explored drawing, blacksmithing, woodworking, papermaking, and new photographic processes in photography.

In a May 21, 1995 article in the Baltimore Sun, credits his father, Gerald C. Grout, for his interest in art and photography. “He’s the one who really got me into photography. He was a physician and a fine photographer. He had his own darkroom, and I used to watch him,” Grout told Sun writer, Ellie Baublitz.

At the time, the article in 1995 described Grout’s show at the Carroll County Arts Center, also a retrospective, “Jubilee: A Photographic Retrospective.”

“Like his father, Mr. Grout has a studio and darkroom in his Westminster home, where he develops prints, standard photos as well as what he calls ‘photoglyphs’ and an even newer image using handmade paper,” wrote Baublitz in 1995.

“His photographs capture people, animals, and nature, mostly in black and white, few in color, some as photoglyphs.

The photoglyphs are a relatively new method of developing prints that Mr. Grout discovered while experimenting with chemicals,” observed Baublitz.

“For those who have the time, Mr. Grout can tell the story behind (each of) his photographs.”

Indeed, his photographs all tell a short philosophical story about Grout’s worldwide travels in the four decades of a life rich in storytelling and experiences.

Grout is “Good picture shooter and a colleague in journalism… (We worked together) starting in the Navy and then at the Hanover Evening Sun… I have three or four walls covered with his work in my home…. (I) recommend you stop by and see his stuff,” said former Carroll County Commissioner and fellow Vietnam veteran, Dean Minnich

Sherri Hosfeld Joseph, the owner of Birdie’s and an artist and critically acclaimed photographer herself, added, “Phil Grout is one of the greatest photojournalists of his generation. We are truly blessed as a community that he has chosen our stories to document. His work will leave you awestruck.”

After his work in Africa, Phil returned to his first love, photojournalism, and newspapers in 2006, freelancing for Patuxent Publishing and its string of papers in central Maryland. His photo illustrations regularly appear in Carroll Magazine as well.

Phil’s photography and reporting have been awarded by the Associated Press, Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association as well as various arts organizations.

"Child of the Universe," a collection of 40 black & white images opens Friday, May 4, 5:30-7:30, at Off Track Art, an artists’ collective and gallery located in the historic Liberty Building at 11 Liberty Street – next to the railroad tracks, off of the Sentinel parking lot at the corner of West Main St and MD 27-Liberty St - in the historic downtown of Westminster, Maryland. The exhibition runs through the month of June.





 Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/
Kevin Dayhoff Art: http://www.kevindayhoff.com/ (http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/http://www.kevindayhoffart.com/ New Bedford Herald: http://kbetrue.livejournal.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/kevindayhoff
Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/ “Each one should use whatever gift he has received to serve others, faithfully administering God’s grace in its various forms.” 1 Peter 4:10

“Off Track Art” is an artists’ co-op and gallery located in the historic Liberty Building at 11 Liberty Street – next to the railroad tracks, off of the Sentinel parking lot at the corner of West Main St and MD 27-Liberty St - in historic downtown Westminster, Carroll County Maryland. 

Open: Wed-Fri. Noon to 6 PM , Sat. 10 AM - 5 PM. http://offtrackart.blogspot.com/ 
 For news and information on Off Track Art previous to December 15, 2011, you can go to http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/search/label/Art%20Off%20Track%20Art

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

National Governors Association: Governors Look To Arts, Culture, And Design To Boost Economic Growth


GOVERNORS LOOK TO ARTS, CULTURE AND DESIGN TO BOOST ECONOMIC GROWTH

NGA Report Focuses on New Engines of Growth

April 30, 2012

WASHINGTON—With concerns over job creation and business growth holding a prominent—and persistent—position on policy agendas today, governors are increasingly finding innovative ways to support economic growth, according to a new report out today from the National Governors Association (NGA).

New Engines of Growth: Five Roles for Arts, Culture, and Design focuses on the role that arts, culture and design can play in governors’ policies to create jobs and boost their economies in the short run and transition to an innovation-based economy in the long run.

In particular, arts, culture and design can assist states with economic growth because they can serve the following roles: 

Provide a fast-growth, dynamic industry cluster;

Help mature industries become more competitive;

Provide the critical ingredients for innovative places;

Catalyze community revitalization; and

Deliver a better-prepared workforce.

“Economic growth is a top priority for all governors,” said Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, a member of NGA’s Executive Committee. “They are using an ‘all-hands-on-deck’ approach throughout all state agencies to put in place policies and programs using arts, culture and design as a means to enhance economic growth.

Globalization and the changing economy have affected individual states differently, but all are searching for ways to support high-growth industries, accelerate innovation, foster entrepreneurial activity, address unemployment, build human capital and revive distressed areas. Using the five roles as a framework, state leaders—governors, economic development officials and state arts agencies—have a way to intentionally and strategically make arts, culture and design an important part of an economic growth agenda.

“As I travel across this country, I have found one thing to be true in state after state: art works,” said NEA Chairman Rocco Landesman. “The National Governor's Association has laid out 5 strategies currently employed by states to use the arts to help strengthen local economies and drive innovation. I look forward to working with our network of state arts agencies to support governors in this work.”

This report was produced by NGA with funding support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

To learn more about state strategies to boost economic growth and job creation, please visit www.nga.org/center.

###

Founded in 1908, the National Governors Association (NGA) is the collective voice of the nation’s governors and one of Washington, D.C.’s most respected public policy organizations. Its members are the governors of the 55 states, territories and commonwealths. NGA provides governors and their senior staff members with services that range from representing states on Capitol Hill and before the Administration on key federal issues to developing and implementing innovative solutions to public policy challenges through the NGA Center for Best Practices. For more information, visit www.nga.org.

Labels: Art Econ Benefits of Art, Art Artists Culture, Jobs and job seekers,


“Off Track Art” is an artists’ co-op and gallery located in the historic Liberty Building at 11 Liberty Street – next to the railroad tracks, off of the Sentinel parking lot at the corner of West Main St and MD 27-Liberty St - in historic downtown Westminster, Carroll County Maryland. 

Open: Wed-Fri. Noon to 6 PM , Sat. 10 AM - 5 PM. http://offtrackart.blogspot.com/ 
 For news and information on Off Track Art previous to December 15, 2011, you can go to http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/search/label/Art%20Off%20Track%20Art